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Read the article about the work of a team of tour operator representatives in Majorca. Then choose the most suitable sentence from numbers 1-6 for each of the gaps in the text (A-F).




ДІЛОВА ІНОЗЕМНА МОВА

Навчально-методичний посібник з розвитку усного мовлення

для практичних занять та самостійної роботи

спеціальностей

8.050401 – Туризм

8.050402 – Готельне господарство

 

 

Запоріжжя

2009


Розглянуто кафедрою перекладу за фахом протокол № 3 від 14 листопада 2009 р. Рекомендовано науково-методичною комісією напряму освіти “Філологія” протокол № 4 від 08 грудня 2009 р.

 

 

Ухвалено до друку вченою радою

Інституту іноземної філології

Класичного приватного університету

протокол № 4 від 25 грудня 2009 р.

 

ДІЛОВА ІНОЗЕМНА МОВА

Навчально-методичний посібник з розвитку усного мовлення

для практичних занять та самостійної роботи

спеціальностей:

8.050401 – Туризм

8.050402 – Готельне господарство

Укладач: Д.С. Аветісова, ст. викладач

 




ЗМІСТ

ВСТУП ……………………………………………………………………........4

UNIT 1  ................................................................................................................5

UNIT 2  ..............................................................................................................10

UNIT 3  ..............................................................................................................16

UNIT 4  ..............................................................................................................20

UNIT 5  ..............................................................................................................25

UNIT 6  ..............................................................................................................29

UNIT 7    ..............................................................................................................34

UNIT 8    ..............................................................................................................38

UNIT 9    ..............................................................................................................42

UNIT 10  ..............................................................................................................47

ЛІТЕРАТУРА ……………………………………………………………........52

 


UNIT 1 . TOUR OPERATORS


Read the article above again and tick the phrase which best completes each statement.

1. The three Tuesday flights:

a) have a supplement;

b) arrive at night;

c) arrive in time for lunch;

d) are popular with families.

2. Tour operators:   

a) tell each other how much they are charging;

b) send their reps to ask holidaymakers how much they have spent on their holidays;

c) send their reps to find out how much holidaymakers know about package holidays;

d) only send their reps to question business clients.

3. Last year:

a) hoteliers were made to pay the tour operator compensation;

b) hoteliers didn't allow Ken to give upgrades;

c) it was easy to find 180 beds in July;

d) hoteliers paid back the compensation paid out to dissatisfied holidaymakers.

4. Tour representatives:

a) are in their early 20s;

b) are all 22 years old;

c) work six hours a day;

d) can't act.

 

3. These words appear in the article Holiday Reps Enjoy a Hard Day's Night. They all have more than one meaning. Tick the dictionary definition, a, b or c, which best fits each word's meaning in the article.

1. stifling

a) very hot: It was a stifling day;

b) prevents breathing: A stifling atmosphere;

c) prevents you from thinking: I was so frightened; their behavior was stifling.

2. to endure/endured

a) to support or bear: We have had to endure many years of inflation;

b) to remain alive or exist: A city built to endure;

c) to suffer something painful for a long time or to deal with an unpleasant situation: There are limits to what the human body can endure.

3. disgorge

a) to bring food back through the mouth from the stomach: After eating Jonah, the whale disgorged him;

b) to throw out/emit: The chimney disgorged smoke;

c) to flow out into the sea: The Mississippi disgorges into the Gulf of Mexico.

4. property/properties

a) personal belongings;

b) land and/or the buildings on it;

c) a quality or power that belongs to somebody or thing: The medicinal properties of a plant.

5. handles/handling

a) to touch or hold: Do not handle the exhibits;

b) to control with your hands: The windsurfer handled the board with skill;

c) to manage or deal with: My secretary will handle all the arrangements.

You work in the personnel department of Global Tours Inc. in Tahiti. Using the active or the passive, complete this letter to Sonia, a new rep, who is about to join your team.

Dear Sonia,

I would like to welcome you to our team here in Tahiti and to outline what (a) … (happen) during your first week with us.

On arrival at the airport you (b) … (meet) by John Le Grand, our area manager, and (c) … (drive) to the Pacific Hotel where you (d) … (live) during the season. There (e) … (follow) a five-day training program where you (f) … (introduce) to your colleagues and (g) … (brief). Then you (h) … (show) how to check in plane-loads of holidaymakers, make short presentations and deal with complaints. Also you (i) … (take) around the island to visit the places you (j) … (take) our guests. There (k) … (be) a short test to complete the program, after which you (l) … (give) a certificate.

Here we (m) … all … (look forward) to meeting you on 1st May and working with you over the summer season.

Yours sincerely.



Complete this conversation between Dominic and Lesley, two travel consultants, who are talking about Lesley's plan for Christmas. It is 15th December. Put the verbs in brackets into the correct tenses and make any other necessary alterations.

Dominic: What (a) … you … (do) for Christmas?

Lesley: I'm really lucky. I've been chosen to go on a trip to Jamaica!

Dominic: Lucky you! How long (b) … you … (be) away?

Lesley: Ten days in all. I (c) … (leave) on 19th December and (d) … (arrive) home in time for the New Year.

Dominic: What kinds of things (e) … you ... (do) while you are there?

Lesley: I (f) … (tour) the island. I (g) … (stay) in three resorts: Montego Bay, Ocho Rios and Port Antonio.

Dominic: Has your itinerary been planned for you or (h) … you … (be able) to decide what you (i) … (do) when you (j) … (get) there?

Lesley: A bit of both, I suppose. My plane (k) … (leave) from Heathrow on 19th December for Montego Bay where I (I) … (stay) in the Richmond Hill Hotel. While I (m) … (be) there I (n) … (have to) complete the questionnaire on what there is to do in the resort, the quality of services, the cost of snacks and drinks for the agency. But I (o) … definitely … (go) to Chukka Cove while I (p) … (be) there to see the polo.

Dominic: (q) … you … (be) in time to watch the Jam-Am yacht race?

Lesley: No, unfortunately it (r) … (finish) before I (s) … (arrive).

Dominic: That's a shame. But I wish I (t) … (go).

 

Read about Bill Morrison, the Senior Publicity Officer for the Irish Tourist Board, talking about how they promote Ireland to the British and German markets. As you read, complete the grid. The first has been done for you.

BRITISH GERMANS
1. How do visitors regard Ireland? as both a domestic and an international destination as an international destination
2. What type of holidays do they come for?    
3. Are the majority independent travelers or package holidaymakers?    
4. What type of client does the Tourist Board target?    
5. How and where do they publicize and market Ireland?    
6. What aspects of Irish life do they stress in the marketing?    

Bill Morrison: The British, you see, regard Ireland almost as their backyard, but on the other hand as a foreign country. For them we are neither an international nor a domestic destination. Geographically, we are very close so it's only a short hop to get here. And, as a result, the British often come for weekend breaks or even for the day. We also share a common language, and culture and history. People know the system, they feel confident, and so if they come for longer periods of time, they are more likely to choose self-catering holidays or take a self-drive trip. For the most part they are independent travelers. Many come so they can enjoy or follow their favorite hobby. Angling and golfing holidays are very popular, with the number of golfing holidays growing. You know we have some of the finest greens in Europe and they are relatively cheap compared to other places. Cycling is also growing in popularity. It's now considered a very healthy occupation, and of course it's become very upmarket. Then again, Ireland is becoming a popular destination for the office outing. Previously companies would take a day trip to the seaside, now they take a weekend break, more and more often to Ireland.

Interviewer: And the Germans?

Bill Morrison: They have a very different impression of Ireland. It's a misty, romantic isle on the edge of the world. They come to find a way of life that they believe no longer exists in Germany: the quiet, peaceful village life of 100 years ago or more. So they come mainly to the West Coast, to the unspoilt landscape. They want to see the way of life, to meet the people. They'll come on coach tours, but unlike the British, who'll take a tour only to appreciate the scenery, they'll come on a study tour, an archaeological tour, an Irish music tour, so that they can learn about the life, the history, while they see the countryside. Even though there are many direct flights from Germany, they tend to come for an average of ten days - transport costs being the major reason. Like the British, they come for outdoor pursuits: walking, cycling and cruising. Cruising on inland waterways is very popular. And above all, they enjoy discovering the small villages, the village life around the pub with Irish music.

Interviewer: And are they independent travelers or do they come with a group?

Bill Morrison: The German travel trade is far more structured than the British. You'll find that even those who come singly, as a family group, have prepaid and prearranged almost everything at home in the travel agents' before they left. Many are on -let's call it a tailored holiday package.

Interviewer: And so how do you market Ireland?

Bill Morrison: Both in Britain and Germany we target the top end of the market. The majority of Germans who come are English speakers. This tends to mean that they belong to the professional classes: A, B and C1 categories. So all our media publicity is aimed at them. We advertise in those journals and specialist magazines that they are likely to read. We promote Irish holidays at those travel fairs where we feel there is an interest, where we want to develop that interest. So we'll have a stand at the Munich CBR, that's the caravan and boat consumer market, the Hamburg holiday fair, Cologne's coach operators' fair and Düsseldorf’s boat show for instance, but we won't be represented at the Equestrian fair in Hamburg in April, though we will be at the Badminton Horse Trials as there is a British market for horse-riding holidays in Ireland. And of course in England and Scotland we have a stand and promote golfing holidays at the major golfing tournaments. We also go to the angling and game fairs as well as attending the major trade fairs such as the World Travel Market fair in London in November. This year there'll be seven travel program series on British television, and we'll be featured in every one. But we are promoting Ireland to the top sector of the holiday market – to the As and Bs – so again we advertise in the specialist journals, the glossy upmarket magazines, the quality papers. But not all our publicity is paid publicity, for instance the television programs. We also receive publicity when journalists include Irish holidays in their travel sections. So every year we help journalists to travel around Ireland. This year we'll assist 300 British journalists and about 80 to 90 German journalists.

Interviewer: So what aspects of Ireland do you stress in your advertising?

Bill Morrison: Both in Germany and England we emphasize those aspects that appeal to the public. To the Germans we market our romantic castles, the misty green landscape, and the fairy-tale image. To both, we stress the personal side of Ireland, village life, the slow relaxed pace of life, the human interest. We also promote the fashionability of Ireland: the fact that Ireland is a favorite hideaway retreat for film stars; that Ireland is a healthy place to come to – fresh air, the simple life, healthy activities. The British are also interested in the Irish film industry. They're also attracted to the golf, to the food – good, fresh ingredients simply cooked, to the good living …

 

 



UNIT 3. RESPONSIBLE TOURISM

 

UNIT 4. TRANSPORT

 

Terry Lee, Britannia’s Advance Planning Manager, is talking about how he plans and executes the company’s summer flight program. Read the interview and decide if these statements are true or false. Correct the false statements.

1. Britannia, a large British air charter carrier, and Thomson, a large British tour operator, decide how many planes will be in use.

2. They have to fill 26,000 slots in a twenty-four-week program.

3. They don’t expect to change their flight plans.

4. The computer system can help the user to predict potential flight disasters.

5. The computer system is fast but has not yet led to direct savings in expenditures.

Dominic: How do you plan the summer program for the world's largest charter airline?

Terry: We get going on the program eighteen months in advance. The initial parameters are first set in discussions between us, the airline, and Thomson, who are both our owners and principal customer. These parameters lay down the amount of flying time Thomson requires, the size of our fleet for the season and its level of use. Once we have them we can get on with organizing the details.

Dominic: So you begin with a blank piece of paper?

Terry: No, not at all. Ideally we would repeat last season's programs, making a few changes where we had come across problems. But of course it's not that easy. There are many issues that influence our decisions.

Dominic: What do you mean?

Terry: Well, for a start I have to talk to my counterpart at Thomson several times a day to check on their commercial needs – such as changes in demand from different airports, the timing of the summer brochure launches. I also have to take into account our profitability targets, maintenance requirements, and the efficient use of the aircraft and their crews. Then there are the constraints imposed from outside. We have to negotiate slots at each airport across the world – some 24,000 slots in a twenty-six week summer program – and we have to contend with airport operating hours and noise restrictions.

Dominic: So how do you do all this?

Terry: Well, we record all this information on what we call our core computer system.

Dominic: So when you've done all that, you're ready for the brochure launch?

Terry: Far from it. First we run a feasibility study – to make sure that the aircraft is not being used twice and that it's flying to an airport where we have slots. At the same time management is running a profitability study. We'll have several alternative plans which have all been looked at in this way before the run-up to the brochure launch.

Dominic: So how do you choose which plan to use?

Terry: Of course a decision has to be made, but even after we've made up our minds we have to be prepared to make changes right up to the last minute, because in order to put this plan into practice we have to have lengthy negotiations with airports and other airlines via the international SITA aviation network. We have a certain number of historic slots at airports. If we need more then we ask for whatever we require.

Dominic: So that's it then?

Terry: No – by no means. We go to the International Slots Allocation conference where there is a week of frenetic horse-trading. Naturally we take our core system work-station with us so we can work out any changes. And we take a systems person with us, just in case the computer crashes. So after that we have our schedules for the summer and the tour operator's brochures can go to print.

Dominic: It all seems very complicated.

Terry: Yes, but the computer has simplified and speeded up the process greatly. It's not only more efficient in our direct costs, but also in overall costs to the airline. And it allows us to see what the key factors are that affect the plan.

 

UNIT 5. CUSTOMER RELATIONS

UNIT 6. HOTEL FACILITIES

 

UNIT 7. SELECTING LOCATIONS

 

An international leisure group is considering opening a new city attraction in the centre of Konstanz in Germany. They have commissioned a report on the area. Complete this extract from the report using the following conjunctions.

However, as a result, in addition to, besides, but, therefore

Konstanz lies on the western side of the Bodensee where the lake drains into the River Rhine. It was founded on the site of a Roman fort, (a) … it is the medieval city that survives to this day, dominating the shoreline, (b) … lying in the centre of an area of outstanding natural beauty, (c) … , it is of little surprise to learn that Konstanz, with a population of 75,000, attracts over 200,000 overnight visitors a year.

With an average stay of only 2.4 nights, Konstanz would appear to be a typical destination for city breaks; (d) … the majority of visitors are day trippers. This is due to its close vicinity to popular holiday regions (e) … its closeness to the island of Mainau which attracts two million day-visitors a year, (f) … the town suffers from serious congestion since most visitors arrive by road.

 

UNIT 8. THINGS TO DO

Jenny McGee is Information Services Manager at the London Tourist Board. She is talking about tourist information services in London and about the qualities and qualifications she requires from her staff. Read and answer these questions.

1. How many Tourist Information Centers does Jenny mention?

2. Where are they situated?

3. How many languages do Jenny's staff require?

4. Which languages are most needed?

5. List the skills Jenny's staff require.

The London Tourist Board operates four Tourist Information Centers. These are situated at the points of entry, the points of arrival into London. The busiest one is situated at Victoria Station and there we deal with 2 million personal enquiries each year. People arrive there via the Gatwick Express from Gatwick Airport; they also come from the coach station – so they've perhaps come up through Europe on the coach. We've got hundreds of thousands of commuters coming through who are also tourists in our eyes; and also we've got the boat trains coming in from the Continent as well.

Other centers are located at Heathrow Airport for obvious reasons and Liverpool Street Station for people arriving from Stansted Airport and from the boat trains from Northern Europe via Harwich. And then, finally, we have an office in Selfridges department store in central London. And then there are centers that aren't operated by London Tourist Board, but which are supported by London Tourist Board, such as the one located at the new Waterloo International Arrivals Complex. So the idea is that when you come into London, wherever you arrive, there should be a welcome service for you.

Therefore, it's important that the staff working in those offices are able to communicate in foreign languages. Most of the independent travelers who arrive who can't speak English come from Europe, and they need people who can talk to them. So the staff that we employ to work in these centers all speak at least two European languages other than English. The people who come from the rest of the world are often visiting friends or relations in the capital, so perhaps they don't need our services so badly. However, we also employ people who speak Chinese, Japanese and Indian languages. Hopefully, we can help anybody who comes through.

Communication skills are paramount, not only foreign languages but also the ability to talk to people and to be able to listen, so listening skills are absolutely essential. Being able to speak really knowledgeably and enthusiastically not just about London but also the rest of the country as well is also important. So they have to have some knowledge of the United Kingdom.

So those are the main skills: languages, interpersonal and communication skills. But these days you're also expected to have computer skills, because most of the information systems that we use are computerized. And you need a very good telephone manner because we are engaged in an awful lot of sales activities. Therefore, experience of sales, retail or shop work is also very important to us, because increasingly tourist centers have to raise income to fund the services they offer.

 

3. Choose a suitable adverb below to complete these sentences. Use each word once only:

slightly, exceptionally, terribly, really, highly, absolutely, perfectly.

1. It was a/n … mild day for the time of year.

2. It is … vital that all tour guides have attended the local history course.

3. The service the guests received at that hotel was … marvelous.

4. The guests felt that the excursion had been … overpriced.

5. This morning everybody was … busy in the office.

6. It was a/n … well-organized excursion.

7. Nowadays hotel managers are … trained.

 

UNIT 9. MARKETING THE PAST

 

UNIT 10. BUSINESS TRAVEL

 

1. Complete these sentences using the following words:

will, won't, must, can't, might, could, should.

1. We … have full occupancy on 15th June.

2. The conference organizer promised to ring us around 2 p.m. this afternoon. That … be him now.

3. Where's Pierre? He … have returned from the station by now! It's only a five-minute walk and he left at three!

4. I'm afraid that Mr. Dupres, the manager, … be back on duty till 8 p.m.

5. The delegates only left an hour ago. I suppose they … have arrived by now.

6. The delegates only left an hour ago. Surely, they … have arrived by now.

7. If the weather holds, they … decide to host the presentation on the terrace. It all depends on which general manager is on duty.

8. The guest speaker … bring his wife to the conference.

9. We … break even by the end of the year.

10. The hotel … re-open till the New Year.

 

Unfortunately, not all business travelers are satisfied with the services they receive. Read the article below about women business travelers. Sentences A-E have been removed from the text. Match them to the correct boxes.

A Yet, while security is considered important by women business travelers, few actually appear to be so concerned as to do anything about it.

B Vanessa Cotton, another frequent business traveler who is managing director of the Event Organization conference company, says the secret is to take control, especially when entertaining business guests.

C Probably the biggest irritation women executives find when traveling on business is the hotel restaurant.

D The Forte Crest chain has for some years adopted a high-profile approach, with a proportion of each hotel's rooms fitted out as Lady Crest rooms.

E Every time business traveler Fiona Driscoll stays in a hotel from now on, she will have the opportunity to get her own back for any lapses of service and, especially, any bias against her as a woman guest, as she is one of the first to sign up for a new scheme aimed at giving a better deal for women business travelers.

Box 1  

Woman Aware has been launched by hotel reservations agency Expotel to find out which are the best and worst hotels for women travelers. Expotel claims that women executives already account for some 35 per cent of all business travelers, and believes that by the turn of the century this figure will rise to about 50 per cent. In America, some estimates suggest that this level has already been reached. British airlines, however, put the figure much lower - about one in every five business-class passengers is a woman traveler, they report.

The Woman Aware scheme – which involves filling out an appraisal form of each hotel – grew out of a survey of 600 frequent women travelers, aiming to discover how they felt they were treated in hotels. It concluded that about three-quarters were unhappy with the security awareness of hotel staff, and, in particular, thought more could be done to conceal room numbers when checking in. About 57 per cent preferred to have room service delivered by a woman, especially late at night.

Box 2  

A recent Hyatt International hotels survey of about 300 women business guests found that few requested a room near a lift or enquired whether the rooms had a chain or spyhole. None saw the need for women-only parking areas, and few apparently noticed if their room key had the number on it.

Hotels, in fact, have a rather ambivalent attitude towards women executives and how they should be treated. Some, such as the Hilton National and Sheraton chains, believe there is no need for positive discrimination in favor of women other than ensuring that staff are trained to take security precautions. Their policy is to treat all guests – men and women – the same: to do otherwise, they argue, would be patronizing. "The key issue is security rather than pink frills and gimmicks," says Hilton.

Box 3  

These typically have an iron and ironing board, spyhole and deadlock on the door, special clothes hangers, women's magazines and a basket of fresh fruit. Decor is lighter than that found in a standard room. Men are not excluded from booking these rooms and, in fact, often request them because of their additional facilities and lighter atmosphere.

Holiday Inn is somewhere between the two extremes: it does not have special room facilities for women, but has developed its Ten Absolute Standards aimed at making women more welcome. These include always offering assistance with luggage, serving women promptly in bars and restaurants, providing a choice of tables, and offering a choice of room location.

Box 4  

A survey by Ramada hotels found that about 60 per cent of solo women travelers prefer to call room service rather than eat alone in a restaurant. Hyatt acknowledges this by trying to provide more imaginative and lighter meals on its room service menus. "We also recognize the need for two tables in the room – one for eating and one for working, as businesswomen spend more time in the room," says John Wallis, Hyatt's vice-president for marketing.

However, not all women find restaurants intimidating. Pamela Carvell, a former director of the Periquito hotels group and now a hotel consultant, says that "the more experienced you are with staying in hotels, the easier it becomes knowing how to deal with hotel restaurants". She says that gradually she has learned to spend more time eating in hotel restaurants rather than in her room.

Box 5  

"I plan my campaign in advance," she says. "I get to the restaurant early to check out the table and set up a tab from the bar and make sure the maitre d' and staff know that I am the host and not hostess. Then I make sure I'm sitting comfortably, with a drink, before my guests arrive."

Some hotels have tried introducing the American concept of a "captain's table", where single women guests (and men, too) dine together, although there seems little enthusiasm for this. Similarly, women-only hotels in London aimed at the woman business traveler have failed to make much impression.

Part of the problem women executives find in hotels may be owing to the relatively few women general managers.

ДІЛОВА ІНОЗЕМНА МОВА

Навчально-методичний посібник з розвитку усного мовлення

для практичних занять та самостійної роботи

спеціальностей

8.050401 – Туризм

8.050402 – Готельне господарство

 

 

Запоріжжя

2009


Розглянуто кафедрою перекладу за фахом протокол № 3 від 14 листопада 2009 р. Рекомендовано науково-методичною комісією напряму освіти “Філологія” протокол № 4 від 08 грудня 2009 р.

 

 

Ухвалено до друку вченою радою

Інституту іноземної філології

Класичного приватного університету

протокол № 4 від 25 грудня 2009 р.

 

ДІЛОВА ІНОЗЕМНА МОВА

Навчально-методичний посібник з розвитку усного мовлення

для практичних занять та самостійної роботи

спеціальностей:

8.050401 – Туризм

8.050402 – Готельне господарство

Укладач: Д.С. Аветісова, ст. викладач

 




ЗМІСТ

ВСТУП ……………………………………………………………………........4

UNIT 1  ................................................................................................................5

UNIT 2  ..............................................................................................................10

UNIT 3  ..............................................................................................................16

UNIT 4  ..............................................................................................................20

UNIT 5  ..............................................................................................................25

UNIT 6  ..............................................................................................................29

UNIT 7    ..............................................................................................................34

UNIT 8    ..............................................................................................................38

UNIT 9    ..............................................................................................................42

UNIT 10  ..............................................................................................................47

ЛІТЕРАТУРА ……………………………………………………………........52

 


UNIT 1 . TOUR OPERATORS


Read the article about the work of a team of tour operator representatives in Majorca. Then choose the most suitable sentence from numbers 1-6 for each of the gaps in the text (A-F).

1. Surprisingly families appear the most demanding clients.

2. Another part of the team's day is spent dealing with complaints and requests for help.

3. During the next week or fourteen days the Sunworld team, headed by Ken Tyrer, will deal with more arrivals and departures and cope with any traumas – human and operational – that happen in between.

4. On the front line the resort reps, average age 22, deal with such problems face to face.

5. Last year part of the team's work involved sorting out overbooking problems created by hoteliers.

6. While most of the team’s work involves day-to-day solving of current problems, there is a great deal of pre-season contracting and late-scale management to undertake.

HOLIDAY REPS ENJOY A HARD DAY'S NIGHT

Palma airport, 02.14 on a stifling Tuesday. A Boeing 757 arrives more or less on time to be greeted by a four-strong team of representatives from the airlines, Sunworld. Having endured the lengthy wait to get their luggage, clients are put on coaches and minibuses to their final destinations. Majorca's diversity means that the aircraft disgorges families on mainstream holidays, youth groups and those taking upmarket villa holidays.

A …………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Sunworld’s team handles forty five flights a week split over three flying days. Surprisingly for such a late hour, 86 per 15 cent of those arriving on the Tuesday morning's three flights are families avoiding expensive weekend price supplements.

"In summer we deal with 5,000 arrivals 20 a week so that means we can have 10,000 people on the island at any one time," said Mr. Tyrer who works twelve hours a day, six days a week during the seven-month summer season.

Looking after Sunworld's clients are his 109 staff, split into the main tourist areas of the north, south and east. Among them, forty-six reps look after 150 properties, including thirty villas.

B ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..

With an 118,000 capacity on the island to sell, Mr. Tyrer's staff remain in daily contact with their commercial department in the UK. "For the following week we can still have between 300 and 500 seats left to sell. It is important we react very quickly," he said. Sunworld sells 70 per cent of capacity from the main brochure but late sales can inevitably cause problems. "Last week we had people going to the same apartment block who had paid £500 from the main brochure, while some had paid £150 for unspecified accommodation on a late special. We have created the problem as an industry ourselves. We try to offer good-quality accommodation but must compete with the market. At present one major operator is offering a week's half board in a three-star hotel for £139, upsetting the balance of the market." Like all major operators, reps are sent to interview other companies' clients to find out who is selling what and for how much.

C…………………………………………………………………………………………………..

"Five administration staff deal with these in resort. Our complaint ratio is 1.9 per cent, which is good considering half those are time-wasters or insurance claims. The team deals with everything, from minor problems such as not having enough sun-beds, to the occasional, but inevitable, call from someone in police custody. Noise complaints are also inevitable given the island's mixed clientele. We try to allocate families and young people separately but even in good family properties there can still be an element of young people. It is a problem throughout the island.

D………………………………………………………………………………………………….

"Things got worse with industrial action by French air traffic controllers which created severe aircraft delays. Our longest delay was twelve hours following a technical problem. We put people into hotels, but finding 180 beds in July or August is not easy," he explained. He paid out £120,000 last summer for 2,200 complaints in resort mainly due to overbooking. "It was all recovered from hoteliers," he added. "This year we are able to give upgrades. Last year we did not have alternatives. So last winter I spent a great deal of time reducing allocations because we knew hotels had overbooked."

E………………………………………………………………………………………….

They each spend six hours a day in resort and then carry out guiding duties on excursions. The popularity of Majorca as the UK's top package-holiday destination means it is a good training ground. "If they can look after 1,000 clients in summer here, a few hundred in winter in Lanzarote is easy. The variety of clients also provides good training. They range from those on their first foreign holiday to VIPs occupying secluded villas. One of the big complaints about Intasun was that the reps were never in the hotel, which is why we employ so many transfer reps. But in certain properties, especially villas, we operate a dial-a-rep service. Many people just want to be left alone."

Unlike some other operators Sunworld spares its reps the indignity of having to be entertainers. "I want them to be professional during the day, which will not work if you see them on stage doing things they are not good at." Most spend a couple of days a week handling arrivals and departures and holding welcoming meetings. Other days are occupied by accounting, management meetings and villa visits.

F……………………………………………………………………………………………..

They want to know what everything costs. "There is a constant demand for information," said Rebecca, a rep in Puerto Pollensa. This is her first season in Majorca but she is coming back for more. "I did not believe people when they said this was a really attractive job but it is."





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