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Read this note from Gisela to Helmut. Find and correct six mistakes in the use of the present perfect with already and yet.



Helmut - I'm in a hurry. I haven't went shopping already but I'll do it on the way home. Rita have just had dinner and she's already had her bath. Have you call Mr. Jacobson yet? He's called already three times today. His daughter has had her flu shot yet. Is it to late? See you later.                                                                                                             G.

19. Put in been or gone.

1. Jim is on holiday. He’s … to Italy.

2. Hello! I’ve just … to the shops. I’ve bought lots of things.

3. Alice isn’t here at the moment. She’s … to the shop to get a newspaper.

4. Tom has … out. He’ll be back in about an hour.

5. “Are you going to the bank?” – “No, I’ve already … to the bank.”

 

 

20. Explain using would:

 

He would save himself! He would not see Lord Henry again. He would go back to Sibyl Vane, marry her and try to love her again. She had suffered more than he had. Poor child! He had been selfish and cruel to her. They would be happy together. His life with her would be beautiful and pure.

Comprehension Task

Answer the questions

1. Had Basil heard the news already? What was it?

2. Was Hallward pleased to hear it?

3. Who was Dorian Gray going to marry to? Was it absurd?

4. What did Lord Henry hope for? Did he really want to spoil Dorian's life?

5. What kind of a man was Lord Henry in Basil's opinion?

6. Was Dorian happy? Why?

7. What happened between Dorian and Sybil that made him to propose her?

8. Did she agree to become his wife?

9. Why did Basil try to stop Lord Henry to annoy Dorian?

10. Why did Dorian laugh when Lord Henry said that Dorian was never annoyed with him? Is it true?

11. What was, in Lord's opinion, the only thing worth having ideas?

12. What, in Dorian's opinion, was pleasure?

13. Where did they go? Why was the painter silent and thoughtful?

14. Was the theatre crowed that night? What was there so new for them that surprised Lord Henry and Basil?

15. Was Dorian Gray proud that he had found Sybil in that place? Why?

16. Did the painter understand Dorian and believe in him?

17. How did the spectators react when Sybil appear? Dorian? Lord Henry?

18. What did Lord Henry whisper to Hallward a quarter of an hour later?

19. Why did Dorian gray's face turn white?

20. Did Sybil notice that the spectators were bored?

21. Who went away from the play? Who stayed?

22. Where did Lord Henry ask Dorian to go with them?

23. Why did Dorian want to be alone?

24. What happened when the play was over? Did Dorian see any excuse for her?

25. How did Sybil explain her bad acting?

26. Why did the girl go white? Did she think that he was serious?

27. Why did he push her back?

28. When did he arrive home?

29. What did he see passing through the library?

30. Why was he surprised? How did the portrait change?

31. Was there any sign of cruelty on his face when he looked at himself in a mirror?

32. What did he suddenly remember?

33. How did he decide to save himself from being cruel?

34. Who was he thinking about when he stepped out on the grass?

Comment on:

a. 'Pleasure is the only thing worth having ideas about.

b. 'I know what pleasure is,' cried Dorian Gray. 'It is to worship someone.' 'That is certainly better than when someone worships you.'

c. Whenever a man does a completely stupid thing, it is always for a good reason.'

d. 'The reason we all like to think so well of others is because we are afraid for ourselves.

e. 'When we are happy we are always good, but when we are good we are not always happy.'

 

Chapter five

Love Becomes Tragedy

'What Is Past Is Past?'

It was nearly one o'clock the next afternoon when he woke up. His servant brought him a cup of tea and some letters. One of them was from Lord Henry, and had been brought by hand that morning. He put it to one side.

He went into the library for breakfast feeling perfectly happy. Then he saw the open window and the covered portrait. Was it all true? Or had it just been a dream? But he remembered that cruel mouth so clearly.

Dorian Gray sent his servant away and locked all the doors. Then he pulled the cover off the painting, and saw himself face to face. It was true. The portrait had changed.

For hours he did not know what to do or think. Finally, he went over to the table and wrote a passionate letter to the girl he had loved. He asked her to forgive him for the terrible things he had said to her.

Suddenly he heard a knock on the door, and he heard Lord Henry's voice outside. 'My dear boy, I must see you. Let me in at once.'

He made no answer, but remained quite still. The knocking continued and grew louder. Yes, it was better to let Lord Henry in. He would explain to him the new life he was going to lead. He jumped up, covered the picture and opened the door.

'I am sorry about it all, Dorian,' said Lord Henry, as he entered. 'But you must not think too much about it.'

'Do you mean about Sibyl Vine?' asked the boy.

'Yes, of course,' answered Lord Henry, sitting down and slowly pulling off his yellow gloves. 'It is terrible, but you are not to blame. Tell me, did you go behind and see her after it was over?'

'Yes.'

'I felt sure that you had. Did you have an argument?'

'I was cruel, Harry - terribly cruel. But it is all right now. I am not sorry for anything that has happened. It has taught me to know myself better.'

'Oh, Dorian, I am so glad that you see it that way.'

'I want to be good, Harry. I don't want my soul to be ugly. I am going to marry Sibyl Vine.'

'Marry Sibyl Vine!' cried Lord Henry, standing up, and staring at him in surprise. 'But, my dear Dorian -'

'Yes, Harry, I know what you are going to say. Something horrible about getting married. Don't say it! Sibyl will be my wife!'

'Your wife! Dorian!... Didn't you get my letter? I wrote to you this morning.'

'Your letter? Oh, yes, I remember. I have not read it yet, Harry.'

'You know nothing yet then?'

'What do you mean?'

Lord Henry walked across the room and sat down next to Dorian Gray. Taking both his hands in his own, he held them. 'Dorian,' he said, 'my letter was to tell you that Sibyl Vane is dead.'

A cry of pain came from the boy's lips and he jumped to his feet. 'Dead! Sibyl dead! It is not true! It is a horrible lie!'

'It is true, Dorian,' said Lord Henry. 'It is in all the morning newspapers. The police will be asking questions, and you must keep your name out of any scandal. Things like that make a man fashionable in Paris. But in London they are a disaster for any gentleman. I suppose they don't know your name at the theatre? If they don't, it is all right. Did anyone see you going round to her room?'

Dorian did not answer for a few moments. Finally he said in a strange voice, 'Harry, did you say that the police are asking questions? What did you mean by that? Did Sibyl -? Oh, Harry this is terrible!'

'I am sure that it was not an accident, though it must be described that way officially. She swallowed something horrible they use at theatres.'

'Harry, Harry, it is terrible!' cried the boy.

'Yes, it is very sad, of course, but it is nothing to do with you. Come with me to dinner, and after we will go to the theatre.'

'So I have murdered Sibyl Vane,' said Dorian Gray, half to himself. 'Yet the roses are not less lovely. The birds still sing happily in my garden. And tonight I will have dinner with you and go to the theatre. How extraordinary life is! My first passionate love letter was to a dead girl. Yet why is it that I cannot feel this tragedy as much as I want to? I don't think I am heartless. Do you?'

'You have done too many foolish things in the last fortnight to be heartless, Dorian,' answered Lord Henry, with his sweet, sad smile.

The boy frowned. 'I don't like that explanation, Harry,' he said, 'but I am glad you don't think I am heartless.'

'A woman has killed herself for the love of you,' said Lord Henry. 'That is very beautiful.'

They were silent. The evening darkened in the room. After some time Dorian Gray looked up. 'How well you know me! But we will not talk again of what has happened. It has been something wonderful. That is all. Now, I have to dress, Harry. I feel too tired to eat anything, but I will join you later at the theatre.'



As Lord Henry closed the door behind him Dorian rushed to the portrait and tore off the cover. No, there was no further change in the picture. It had received the news of Sibyl Vane's death before he had known of it himself. Tears came to his eyes as he remembered her. He brushed them away and looked again at the picture.

He felt the time had come to choose. Or had he already chosen? Yes, life had decided that for him. The portrait was going to carry his shame: that was all.

An hour later he was at the theatre, and Lord Henry was sitting beside him.

As he was eating breakfast the next morning, Basil Hallward was shown into the room.

I am so glad I have found you, Dorian,' he said. 'I called last night, and they told me that you were at the theatre. Of course I knew that was impossible. I had a terrible evening worrying whether one tragedy would be followed by another. I can't tell you how heart-broken I am about the whole thing. Did you go and see the girl's mother? What did she say about it all?'

'My dear Basil, I don't know,' said Dorian Gray. He looked very bored. 'I was at the theatre.'

'You went to the theatre?' said Hallward, speaking very slowly. 'You went to the theatre where Sibyl Vane was lying dead?'

'Stop, Basil! I won't hear it!' cried Dorian, jumping to his feet. 'You must not speak of such things. What is done is done. What is past is past.'

'You call yesterday the past? Dorian, this is horrible! Something has changed you completely. You look exactly the same as the wonderful boy in my picture, but now there is no heart in you. It is all Harry's influence. I see that.'

The boy went to the window and looked out at the garden for a few moments.

'Harry has taught me many things, Basil.' he said at last. 'You have only taught me to love my own beauty.'

'I am truly sorry for that, Dorian.'

I don't know what you mean, Basil,' he said, turning round. 'I don't know what you want. What do you want?'

'I want the Dorian Gray I used to paint,' said the artist sadly.

'Basil,' said the boy, going over to him and putting his hand on his shoulder, 'you have come too late. Yesterday when I heard that Sibyl Vane had killed herself-'

'Killed herself! My God! Is there no doubt about that?' cried Hallward.

'My dear Basil! Of course she killed herself.'

The older man put his face in his hands. 'How terrible,' he said in a quiet voice.

'No,' said Dorian Gray, 'there is nothing terrible about it. It is one of the great romantic tragedies of our time. I know you are surprised at me talking to you like this. You have not realized how I have changed. I was a boy when you knew me. I am a man now. I have new passions, new thoughts, new ideas -'

'But Dorian -'

'I am different, but you must not like me less. Of course I am very fond of Harry. But I know that you are better than he is. You are not stronger - you are too afraid of life - but you are better. And how happy we used to be together! Don't leave me, Basil, and don't argue with me. I am what I am.'

The painter felt strangely sad. Dorian Gray was extraordinarily important to him. The boy had changed his art. Perhaps his cruel talk about Sibyl Vane was just a mood that would pass away. There was so much in him that was good.

'Well, Dorian,' he said with a sad smile, 'I won't speak to you again about this horrible thing. I only hope that your name is kept out of any scandal. Have the police asked to see you?'

Dorian shook his head. 'They don't even know my name,' he answered.

'She didn't know your name?'

'Only my first name, and I am sure that she did not tell it to anyone. She told her family that I was Prince Charming. It was pretty of her. You must do me a drawing of Sibyl, Basil. I would like to have something more of her than the memory of a few kisses.'

'I will try and do something, Dorian. But you must come and sit for me again. I can't work so well without you.'

'I can never sit for you again, Basil. It is impossible!' he cried.

'My dear boy, what is this foolishness!' Hallward cried. 'Did you not like what I did for you? Where is it? Why have you covered it? Let me look at it. It is the best thing I have ever done. It is very bad of your servant to hide my work like that. I felt the room looked different as I came in.'

'It was not my servant who covered it, Basil. I did it myself. The light was too strong on the portrait.'

'Too strong! No, the light is perfect in here. Let me see it.' And Hallward walked towards the corner of the room.

A terrible cry came from Dorian Gray's lips, and he rushed between the painter and the covered portrait. 'Basil, you must not look at it! I don't want you to.'

'Not look at my own work! Are you serious? Why shouldn't I look at it?' cried Hallward, laughing.

'If you try and look at it, Basil, I promise I will never speak to you again. I am very serious.'

Hallward looked at Dorian Gray in surprise. He had never seen him like this before. The boy's face was white and angry.

'Dorian!'

'Don't speak!'

'But what is the matter? Of course I won't look at it if you don't want me to,' he said coldly, walking over to the window. 'But it seems rather absurd that I cannot see my own work when I am going to exhibit it in Paris in the autumn.'

'To exhibit it? You want to exhibit it?' cried Dorian Gray. A terrible fear was building inside him. Was the world going to see his secret? Were people going to stare at the mystery of his life? That was impossible.

'Yes, George Petit is going to exhibit all my best pictures in October. Don't worry, it is only for one month.'

Dorian Gray passed his hand across his face. It felt hot and wet. He felt that he was about to face horrible danger. 'You told me a month ago that you would never exhibit it,' he cried. 'Why have you changed your mind?' He stopped suddenly and a cruel look came into his eyes. He had remembered something Lord Henry had said to him, 'Ask Basil why he won't exhibit your picture. He told me once and it is a very strange story.' Yes, perhaps Basil too had his secret. He would ask him and try.

'Basil,' he said, coming over quite close, and looking him straight in the face. 'We all have secrets. What was your reason for not wanting to exhibit my picture?'

'Dorian, if I told you, you might like me less than you do now. And you would certainly laugh at me. If you don't want me ever to look at your picture again, I won't. I have always you to look at. Your friendship is more important to me than exhibiting a painting.'

'No, Basil, you must tell me,' said Dorian Gray. His feeling of fear had passed away. Now he just wanted to find out Basil Hallward's mystery.

'Dorian,' said the painter, who did not look happy. 'Have you ever noticed something in the picture, something strange?'

'Basil!' cried the boy, staring at him with wild eyes.

'I see you did. Dorian, from the moment I met you, your personality had the most extraordinary influence over me. I worshipped you. I was jealous of everyone you spoke to. I wanted to have you all to myself. I was only happy when I was with you. When you were away from me you were still there in my art.'

'Basil -'

'No, don't speak. I must tell you now what I did not tell you then. That I decided to paint a wonderful portrait of you. I put all my feelings for you into that picture. I felt, Dorian, that I had told too much. I had put too much of myself into it. So I decided never to exhibit the portrait. I told Harry and he laughed. When the picture was finished, and I sat alone with it, I felt that I was right... Later, I thought that perhaps I was being foolish and when this Paris offer came... but I see now that the picture cannot be shown.'

Dorian Gray breathed deeply. The colour came back to his cheeks and a smile crossed his lips. The danger was over and he was safe for a while. What a sad story Basil had told. Would he ever be so influenced by the personality of a friend? Lord Henry had the charm of being very dangerous. But that was all.

'It is extraordinary to me, Dorian,' said Hallward, 'that you saw this in the portrait.'

I saw something in it,' he answered, 'something that seemed to me very strange.'

'Well, you don't mind me looking at the thing now?'

Dorian shook his head. 'You must not ask me that, Basil. I cannot let you stand in front of that picture.'

'You will one day, won't you?'

'Never.'

'Well, perhaps you are right. And now goodbye, Dorian. You have been the one person in my life who has really influenced my art. But you don't know what it cost me to tell you all that I have told you.'

'My dear Basil,' said Dorian, 'what have you told me? Only that you worshipped me too much. That is not even flattery.'

'It was not meant as flattery. And now that I have told you, something seems to have gone out of me. Perhaps you should never put what you worship into words.'

'You mustn't talk about worship. It is foolish. You and I are friends, Basil, and we will always be friends.'

'You have got Harry.' said the painter, sadly.

'Oh, Harry!' laughed the young man. 'Harry spends his life saying and doing extraordinary things. He lives the sort of life I want to live. But I don't think I would go to Harry if I was in trouble. I would prefer to go to you, Basil.'

'You will sit for me again?'

'Impossible! There is something terrible about a portrait. It has a life of its own. I will come and have tea with you instead.'

'Well, goodbye then. I am sorry that you won't let me look at the picture again. But I understand what you feel about it.'

As he left the room, Dorian Gray smiled to himself. Poor Basil! How little he knew of the true reason. And now he understood more the painter's wild and jealous feelings, and he felt sorry. There was something tragic in a friendship so corrupted by passion.

He rang the bell to call his servant. He had to hide the portrait immediately. It had been mad of him to leave it in a place where it could be discovered by his friends.

Activities

Phonetic exercises

1. a) Transcribe the next words from the chapter:

Passionate; knock; gloves; disaster; accident; officially; explanation; swallow; murder; heartless; further; influence; doubt; pretty; perhaps; wild; corrupted; immediately.

b) Read them aloud

Speech patterns:

a. Do you mean ...

b. ... - What do you mean?

c. It's nothing to do with ...

d. No doubt about it?

e. Why shouldn't I look (stare; glance; listen to; know...)

f. ... - What's the matter?

g. Have you ever noticed ... (heard; thought; felt....)

h. You don't mind me looking ...

i. You don't know what it cost me to ...

Work on vocabulary

2. Find in the chapter the English for:

Жестокий; запереть дверь; снять покрывало; страстный; простить; позволь мне войти; новая жизнь, которую ты собираешься вести; вы не виновны; крик боли; полиция будет допрашивать; не допустить скандала; дальнейшие изменения; смахнуть слёзы; нести позор; убитый горем; нет сомнений; настроение; в чём дело, передумать; дикий; влияние; боготворить; чего это стоило мне; быть в беде; своя собственная жизнь; сожалеть.

3. Use one of the words or word-combinations from the box in an appropriate form to fill each gap:

a disaster          to let smb. in             to pull off             to keep smth. out   passionate         to murder             pain            to swallow                   instead   to blame             an accident              to tear off            a mood                    to breathe   to join               to be heart-broken                  to worship               wild          a shame   a doubt                   to corrupt              to be shown into                  to be jealous

1. Then he  _________the cover _________ the painting, and saw himself face to face.

2. Finally, he went over to the table and wrote a _____________letter to the girl he had loved.

3. Yes, it was better to _________Lord Henry ________.

4. 'It is terrible, but you are not____________.

5. A cry of __________came from the boy's lips and he jumped to his feet.

6. The police will be asking questions, and you must _________your name _________ of any scandal.

7. But in London they are _________for any gentleman.

8. 'I am sure that it was not__________, though it must be described that way officially.

9. She __________something horrible they use at theatres.'

10. 'So I have _________Sibyl Vane,' said Dorian Gray, half to himself.

11. I feel too tired to eat anything, but I will ________you later at the theatre.'

12. As Lord Henry closed the door behind him Dorian rushed to the portrait and _______ the cover.

13. The portrait was going to carry his ________: that was all.

14. As he was eating breakfast the next morning, Basil Hallward ________the room.

15. I can't tell you how __________I am about the whole thing.

16. 'Killed herself! My God! Is there no _______about that?' cried Hallward.

17. Perhaps his cruel talk about Sibyl Vane was just ________that would pass away.

18. I ________you. I was _________of everyone you spoke to.

19. Dorian Gray _________deeply. The colour came back to his cheeks and a smile crossed his lips.

20. It has a life of its own. I will come and have tea with you___________.'

21. And now he understood more the painter's ________and jealous feelings, and he felt sorry.

22. There was something tragic in a friendship so _________by passion.

4. Give the opposite to:

Sweet, cruel, ugly, wet, to whisper, passionate, a friend, to rush, dead, to doubt, to blame.

5. Choose the right word:

Intelligent , quick-witted, clever, smart

1. He was ______enough to interpret this strange phenomenon. 2. He was always expected to give a ______ advice. 3.  He was ______ though he had not got a proper education. 4. He was _______: it didn’t take him long to discover their ironical attitude.

Allow - let - permit

1. You can’t ______your daughter, at her age, have her ways. 2.  ______me help you with your bag. 3. My sister doesn’t _______me to take her books. It is not _______to smoke in the hall. (allow, let, permit)

keep – maintain

1. He always … his promise. 2. I’m sorry I …you waiting. 3. The most part of the state budget goes to … the army. 4. Mr. Watson had a wife and family to …. 5. One must … his own health.

6. Fill in the gaps in these sentences. In sentences 1-5, use a form of either come or go. In sentences 6-10, add a preposition.

1. His tie doesn’t really _______ with his suit.

2. As the course ______ on, I began to enjoy it more.

3. Apple trees usually _______ into bloom in April in England.

4. It ______ without saying that we’ll give her a birthday present.

5. Please _____ round and see me some time soon.

6. My alarm clock goes … every morning at 7.15.

7. It’s always hard to come … terms with a death in the family.

8. Her jokes never quite seem to come … .

9. Although the children have been … the go all day, they don’t seem tired.

10. They went … great lengths to make the evening success.

 

7. Translate into Russian the following sentences paying attention to the words a) breath; b) trouble:

 a) 1. The children lay in bed with held (bated) breaths. 2. The stories he told were fascinating, they took your breath away (they were breathtaking). 3. Whatever you say won’t convince him. You are just wasting your breath. 4. I’m going out for a breath of air. 5. While father had his afternoon nap all the members of the household spoke under their breath and walked tiptoe. 6. Mrs Whiteside said they never took boarders and Molly could have the third bedroom upstairs, all in the same breath.

 

b) 1. He seems to be permanently looking for trouble. 2. It looks as if he were in trouble. 3. We don’t know where he is; he must have got into trouble. 4. The wisest thing to do is not to make trouble. 5. So far as she was concerned she didn’t want any trouble. 6. Don’t trouble trouble till trouble troubles you. 7. I’m sorry to trouble you but could you help me with the exercise? 8. He didn’t take trouble to come. 9. He takes much trouble to overcome it. 10. As far as I know he had some heart trouble.

8. Translate into Russian:

 a) a rush of customers, in a rush, rush-hours, a rush for smth., a rush for treasure, a rush of armaments, a rush of blood, gold rush, rush work, to rush to a conclusion, to rush into an undertaking.

b) a sweet smell, a sweet voice, a sweet heart, sweet milk, sweet revenge, a sweet tooth,  

sweet water, sweet soil, to keep the room sweet, sweet disposition, sweet face, to be  

sweet on smb., at one’s own sweet will, sweet pea, sweet talk.

 

c) bitter disappointment, the bitter truth, bitter fate, bitter cup, a bitter struggle, a bitter   

enemy, bitter cold, a bitter pill to swallow, a bitter quarrel, to the bitter end, a bitter-

 ender, bittersweet.

 

9. Study the expression with keep. Translate them. Make up the sentences of your own using these expressions.

 

To keep doing smth., to keep a secret, to keep smth. back, to keep to one’s bed, to keep an eye on smth. or smb., to keep in one’s feeling, to keep away, to keep smb. from doing smth., to keep out of smb’s way, to keep to the subject, to keep one’s promise (word), to keep to the diet, to keep up traditions, to keep up with smb.

 

10. Translate the following sentences into English using a) get over, b) break

a) 1. Прошло несколько месяцев, прежде чем она оправилась от перенесённого потрясения. 2. Доктор сказал, что ваш ребёнок скоро поправится. 3. До сих пор опомнится не могу от испуга. 4. Я не могу позабыть этого голодного ребёнка. 5. Он не может пережить провал своей книги. 6. Вы скоро свыкнетесь с этой переменой, и всё будет хорошо.

 

b) 1. Я хочу, чтобы ничто не нарушило наш покой. 2. Первым делом она сообщила приятную новость. 3. Он давно порвал с ней всякие отношения. 4. Её голос прерывался от волнения. 5. Вы не разменяете мне деньги? 6. Крик сорвался с его губ. 7. У неё есть привычка вклиниваться в разговор. 8. Он больше не мог сдерживаться и расхохотался. Вторая мировая война началась в 1939 году.

11. Find the Russian equivalents for the following and use them in sentences of your own. Mind the article:

Arm in arm, face to face, back to back, one by one, stride for stride, side by side, step by step from head to foot, head over heels, from father to son, from left to right, look east and west, to keep step with smb., to a T, to live at one, in one’s heart of hearts, an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, tit for tat, , time after time, one in a hundred, husband and wife.

    12. Fill in the blanks with either used to or be used to.

1. He … call on her once or twice a week. 2. We … say of him that he was the best of fellows. 3. They … getting up early. 4. She … living alone. 5. I can take care of the children. I … it. 6. He … play golf very well. 7. 'I want the Dorian Gray I ... paint,' said the artist sadly.8. And how happy we ... be together! Don't leave me, Basil, and don't argue with me.

13. Fill in prepositions:

It was nearly one o'clock the next afternoon when he woke....

One of them was from Lord Henry, and had been brought ... hand that morning.

He went into the library ...breakfast feeling perfectly happy.

Dorian Gray sent his servant ... and locked all the doors. Then he pulled the cover ... the painting, and saw himself face ... face.

... hours he did not know what to do or think. Finally, he went ...to the table and wrote a passionate letter ...the girl he had loved.

Suddenly he heard a knock ...the door, and he heard Lord Henry's voice outside. 'My dear boy, I must see you. Let me ... ... once.'

Yes, it was better to let Lord Henry .... He jumped ..., covered the picture and opened the door.

'Yes, of course,' answered Lord Henry, sitting ...and slowly pulling ... his yellow gloves.

'Marry Sibyl Vine!' cried Lord Henry, standing ..., and staring ... him ... surprise.

Lord Henry walked ...the room and sat ...next to Dorian Gray.

The police will be asking questions, and you must keep your name ... ... any scandal.

Dorian did not answer ... a few moments. Finally he said ... a strange voice, 'Harry, did you say that the police are asking questions?

'You have done too many foolish things in the last fortnight to be heartless, Dorian,' answered Lord Henry, ...his sweet, sad smile.

As Lord Henry closed the door behind him Dorian rushed to the portrait and tore ...  the cover.

Tears came ...  his eyes as he remembered her. He brushed them ... and looked again ...  the picture.

As he was eating breakfast the next morning, Basil Hallward was shown ... the room.

I had a terrible evening worrying whether one tragedy would be followed by another.

The boy went to the window and looked ... ...the garden ... a few moments.

'Harry has taught me many things, Basil.' he said ... last.

'I am truly sorry ... that, Dorian.'

The older man put his face ...  his hands. 'How terrible,' he said ... a quiet voice.

Of course I am very fond ... Harry. You are not stronger - you are too afraid ... life - but you are better.

I only hope that your name is kept ... of any scandal.

And you would certainly laugh ... me.

'No, Basil, you must tell me,' said Dorian Gray. His feeling of fear had passed .... Now he just wanted to find ...  Basil Hallward's mystery.

'Dorian,' said the painter, who did not look happy. 'Have you ever noticed something in the picture, something strange?'

'Basil!' cried the boy, staring ... him ...wild eyes.

'I see you did. Dorian, ...the moment I met you, your personality had the most extraordinary influence ... me. I worshipped you. I was jealous ...everyone you spoke to.

 The danger was ... and he was safe for a while.

Would he ever be so influenced ...  the personality of a friend?

'Oh, Harry!' laughed the young man. 'Harry spends his life saying and doing extraordinary things. He lives the sort of life I want to live. But I don't think I would go to Harry if I was in trouble. I would prefer to go to you, Basil.'

As he left the room, Dorian Gray smiled ...  himself.

There was something tragic in a friendship so corrupted ...passion.

It had been mad of him to leave it in a place where it could be discovered ... his friends.

Grammar

14. Read each numbered sentence. Write T (True) or F(False) for the statement that follows:

1. I've recently joined the programme. I am a new member of the cast. ________

2. I have never been to Scotland. I went to Scotland a long time ago. __________

3. He's gone shopping. He's shopping now. ________

4. Have you ever seen this film? I want to know when you saw the film. _______

5. Someone asks you, "Have you read any good books lately?" They want to know about a book you read last year. ________

6. She's visited New York several times. This is her first visit to New York.________

7. She has become very popular. She is very popular now. __________

15. Read this script from a scene from "Family". Complete it with the Present Perfect form of the verbs in the box.

try (х 2)             have               eat                want (х3)            be                 travel

 

Carol: This is a nice restaurant. _______you ever _______ the steak?

Jimmy: No, but I _________ the spaghetti. I always have it. Actually, I _______ never _______ meat. I think it's cruel to animals. I bet you _______ never _____ out with a vegetarian before, have you?

Carol: No, I haven't actually. Tell me, _______ you ________ to live out of London? You know, out in the countryside somewhere.

Jimmy: Out of London? Are you crazy? No, seriously, I ______ never ______ to leave London. I love it here.

Carol: But _____ you ever _________ to move to another country or another city at least?

Jimmy: No, why should I? I've got everything I want here. You like London too, don't you?

Carol: Well, yes, it's OK. But I ______ all over the world and other places are just as nice.

Jimmy: You may be right. Anyway ______ you ever ______ the new Mexican restaurant on High Street? How about going there tomorrow?







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